Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Why Can’t I Have Both

Sitting in the waiting room dreading the call of my name, I looked around at everyone else doing the same, I have never been a fan of needles even though I get myself poked about five times a day, you would think I would be used to it by now, thirty five years of insulin shots and blood draws on a regular basis has not made me immune to the fear of needles as of yet.

Yesterday was time for me to have my blood drawn for the Doctor to get the numbers required to fill in all the blanks on the forms he is required to fill out in my chart, I am sure these numbers will someday save the world once they are plugged into the master computer which will tell Diabetics all over that I shouldn’t have eaten that huge chunk of carrot cake, and this just may be one of the reasons my A1c will not be a good number for the charts this time around.

Now this may be too much information, but I am just stalling even talking about the blood draw, the nurse steps out and yells “Jimmy you are next” so I reluctantly grab my cane and hurry as fast as I can toward the door, Cindy makes a break for the door and blocks it, she turns me into the direction of the slaughter and I feel myself getting weak as they drag me through the proper door, Now with those thoughts popping out of my head I rise from my seat and follow the phlebotomist to the lab.

Inside the lab they have three draw stations, I was assigned to chair number two, and began answering all the questions that verify I am the person they are supposed to be poking, just about the time she began jabbing the needle into my arm I hear a voice asking, How are you doing? I replied to the lady who was being sat into chair number three right next to me, I’m doing good, I was trying my best to not look at the needle in my arm as the phlebotomist switched to a new tube for the next fill.

Look they only took one tube from me and they are getting another from you, I heard from seat number three, I tried to laugh as they changed my tube once again, How are you doing she asked again, I said again that I was OK and she stood to put her jacket on, walking right in front of my chair she says, Looks like you are finished Babe, you still OK? Her phlebotomist giggled and said you act like you know him.

Cindy smiled and said yes I do, he is my husband, they laughed and she said that she was watching us look and react to one another, she figured either we knew each other or there was a lot of flirting going on, I say why can’t I have both.

19 comments:

  1. awwww, it's good to have a partner in crime right? Hey, I been type 1 for 41 years, it sucks, especially the blood draws! take care.

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  2. Can't imagine the needles consistently! I can't even look if I get a splinter;)

    Well....to grin and bear it- I say, "The more the merrier";))

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  3. Although there was an amusing side to your post, it made me think of hubs who has Diabetes2. I keep him on a tight leash regarding what he can and can't eat; so far he's doing well. I sincerely hope he doesn't have to go through anything worse.

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  4. I dread the blood draw. They act as though they are trying to get blood from a turnip with me (my veins roll or something). I'm sorry you have to go through that so often.

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  5. "she figured either we knew each other or there was a lot of flirting going on, I say why can’t I have both."

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! You two are hysterical!!

    " I was trying my best to not look at the needle in my arm as the phlebotomist switched to a new tube for the next fill."

    I'm the same way, Jimmy. As long as I don't look I'm okay. Luckily my veins are are at the surface and big, therefore whenever I've had to have blood drawn, it's pretty easy for them.

    But, I still can't stand doing it - HA!

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  6. I'm not afraid of needles but having my blood drawn is horrible. I hate hate hate it.

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  7. honey i feel your pain no matter how many times you get stuck you never like it and you never get use to it

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  8. Hey Jojo, A partner in crime is really a good thing especially when it comes to T1 Diabetes, I’ve never figured a way around the blood draws, just part of the deal it seems.

    Dawn, You are so right, Grin and bear it because it is not going away whether I like it or not.

    Hey Valerie, Cindy keeps me on a tight leash also, this is just something we have to do in order to keep it in control, laughing at it sure helps at times :^)

    Staying on the strict regimen of taking your meds and meals on a consistent schedule will help keep the side effects away, nothing wrong with a tight leash here.

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  9. Bijoux, I have been through the blood draws in which everything goes wrong before, most times they go smoothly but then there are those that scare the heck out of you.

    Hey Ron, I do a whole lot better if I don’t look while they are poking me, Cindy on the other hand has to watch every move, I suppose this is part of the reason we get along so well :^)

    Tress, There is something about a blood draw that just goes all through you in a scary way it seems, I know it’s necessary but that don’t mean I have to enjoy it..Right?

    True Becca, I don’t think you ever get used to it, thirty five years later and it’s still like the first time each time :^0

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  10. Doing this together is great! Or as great as getting poked with a needle can be! LOL!

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  11. My dad has been giving himself insulin shots for the last 40 some years. Fortunately, diabetes hasn't found me. As for shots, I'm not fond of them, but getting them doesn't really bother me either.

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  12. Very True Linda, Getting poked with a needle can only be so fun huh Ha Ha

    Hey Matty, I started giving myself insulin injections when I was about fifteen, a lot has changed over the years but the dread of the blood draw has never changed for me.

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  13. Jimmy, I checked the rule book...you can have both! I'm with you on being a needle wuss...after about a bazillion shots during my military career...I still freak when I see a needle coming near me.

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  14. Thank You Sir, I sure like the fact that the rule book says I can actually have both :) I am thinking none of us really like the needles.

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  15. There is no reason that you can't have both!
    They draw my blood every 2 months. I seem to have really gotten used to it (I'm happy to say). But regular injections go into my arms only. An injection in the butt, makes me want to pass out, so I refuse them!

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  16. Hey Pat, Glad you have gotten used to it somewhat, that makes it much easier, the regular injections for me are not too bad as long as Cindy is giving them, it's a bit harder it seems for me to inject myself anymore, a lot depends on the area, in my belly is easier that top of my leg, my backside I am with you on I have to say no when it comes to that area too.

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  17. If I had a nickle--er dime--(Inflation) for every tube of blood I have drawn over 30 years--we could start a Hepatitis Farm!

    PS: Diabetes isn't caused by Sugar--it's caused by BREATHING!!! I think we are all on the list!

    Be Blessed Brother--you and Cindy Both!

    Awwww Honey---ahhh Sugar sugar,,,,, You are my candy girl- And I just can't stop loving you!!!

    OK My Bad!

    J

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  18. tap tap--is this on....and Yes, I checked with the Medical Legal Bureau of the Insulin Injection Society of Rotating Sites---and you can have Your Cake- and Cindy too!

    J

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  19. Hey John, With my 35 years and your 30 that would be a whole blood bank :)

    Diabetes is getting more common sad to say, it's a condition that is so hard to control and the blood draws just keep us on track I suppose.

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